Time for reporting about my project in film photography. I’m going to share the results I got using Fujicolor Pro400H, discuss some of the results and explain why I have my negatives scanned by the labs. So lots to talk about!

For the first part of my film photography project I’ll be using the Olympus OM2 SP Camera, fitted with Olympus Zuiko 50mm f1.8 Lens (has a value of £50-80 second hand) and loaded with a 36 exposer roll of Fujicolor Pro400H. Now I never use my film at box speed, and by this I mean the ISO rating, so this particular film is rated at ISO 400 and will give good results, but with film it works the opposite to digital where by you can overexpose the film giving more detail in the shadow and richer colours.

With some films you can over expose by up to 5 stops and still have an amazing image as film is so forgiving. By experience, Pro400H looks best at 1-2 stops over exposed so I’ll set my cameras ISO setting to 200 giving me 1 full stop of over expose on every shot. Its important to note when getting the film developed you must get it developed at the box speed of 400.

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop, Tower Bridge London

Fujicolor Pro400H

I’m going to cover 4 different types of film over the months, so after loading my roll of film in to the camera and only working in full manual mode due to my light meter battery being flat (with the OM2 you can still use the camera at 60th sec with no battery and mechanical shutter) I started to take some indoor shots of my boy, although slightly out of focus the results in exposer were good.

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop, Lisa my better half

The day didn’t stop, with me capturing my better half and the house hold pet dog Lilly. I’m sure everyone including the dog was sick of me after a couple of hours, so it was time for a trip to town. This gave me the perfect moment to get a battery for my camera. Boom I have a light meter and I get to shoot at speeds up to 1/1000sec. I made my way over to the newly refurbished Reading train station, and on getting the scans back I’m in love with the look and feel of the images, this includes the colours, grain and details in the shadows, not forgetting I’m over exposing every shot by a stop of light.

Fujicolor Pro400H Film

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop, Outside Reading Train Station

Fujicolor Pro400H Film

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop, On the platforms in Reading Train Station

Fujicolor Pro400H Film

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop, Reading Train Station

It was a Sunday morning, and the first sunny one this year, so I loaded the Dog in to the car and headed off to the woods. I’m really excited to see what results I can get from this film with browns and greens over exposing. Shooting at low apertures I wasn’t to be disappointed with vibrant colours and loads of details in the shadows.

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop, Lilly the family dog

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop

I was heading to Barry in Wales to cover a workshop on portrait photography, so film camera in hand, at the end of the day I pulled the model to one side and took this shot in a renovated church using just the light coming in through the window.

Fujicolor Pro400H Film

Fujicolor Pro400H Film Pushed one stop.

I’m on a quest for colour, and trying Portra 400 is next on the list. Coincidently I have a holiday planned to Mexico (I know how lucky I am), so lots of colour all around. I brought a second hand Leica M6 from classic cameras in London at a cost of £995 in excellent condition and six rolls of Kodak Portra 400 Professional. Make sure to check out the other post’s on film and there results.

If you’re keen to get back in to film, and looking for more website’s then take a look at 35mmc, there is a wealth of information on there from film, cameras, and getting started.

Fujicolor Pro400H

Kodak Portra 400 Professional

Kodak Ekatar 100 Color Negative Film

Kodak TRI-X 400 Professional